Writing A Great Essay

Writing A Great Essay-81
How much evidence you use depends on the type of essay you are writing.If you want a weight of evidence on some factual point, bring in two or three examples but no more.Essays are generally a blend of researched evidence (e.g. Some students' essays amount to catalogues of factual material or summaries of other people's thoughts, attitudes, philosophies or viewpoints.

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You will be encouraged and expected to cite other authors or to quote or paraphrase from books that you have read.

The most important requirement is that the material you cite or use should illustrate, or provide evidence of, the point you are making.

When you are citing another author's text you should always indicate exactly where the evidence comes from with a reference, i.e.

give the author's name, date of publication and the page number in your work.

Paragraphs show when you have come to the end of one main point and the beginning of the next.

A paragraph is a group of sentences related to aspects of the same point.Use these as your research base but try to expand on what is said and read around the subject as fully as you can.Always keep a note of your sources as you go along.Generally, it is important to back up the points you wish to make from your experience with the findings of other published researchers and writers.You will have likely been given a reading list or some core text books to read.In other words, indicate what has been learned or accomplished.The conclusion is also a good place to mention questions that are left open or further issues which you recognise, but which do not come within the scope of your essay.An essay usually takes the following structured format: The function of the introduction is simply to introduce the subject, to explain how you understand the question, and describe briefly how you intend to deal with it.You could begin by defining essential terms, providing a brief historical or personal context if appropriate, and/or by explaining why you think the subject is significant or interesting.Keep the introduction short, preferably to one or two paragraphs and keep it, succinct, to the point.Some students find it best to write a provisional introduction, when starting to write an essay, and then to rewrite this when they have finished the first draft of their essay.

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